lassen peak

The Lassen National Forest is  one of 18 national forests in California. Covering 1.2 million acres, it lies at the crossroads of the Modoc Plateau, the Great Basin, the Cascade Range, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains in Northeast California. The Lassen National Forest is a tremendous public asset that provides a variety of outdoor recreation opportunities to forest visitors.

Enjoy relaxing and camping at our many campgrounds, fishing at Lake Almanor, Eagle Lake, and Hat Creek, or hundreds of streams, or hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. You are sure to find that perfect activity that will leave you wanting more.

 

Major Recreation Areas

Hat Creek – In the shadow of Lassen Peak, six campgrounds and four picnic areas are nestled along 10 miles of Hat Creek. There are opportunities for fishing, hiking, camping, picnicking, and viewing wildlife. Hat Creek also has lava tubes, massive lava flows, and spatter cones that reveal an exciting volcanic past.

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Hat Creek Camping

Lake Almanor – In a scenic mountain setting, Lake Almanor is one of the largest man-made lakes in California at 75 square miles. It offers fishing, boating, water skiing, swimming, camping, and picnicking. The Almanor Recreation Trail winds along the west side of Almanor, providing views of the lake, mountains, wildflowers, and wildlife. Family and group campgrounds, boat launch facilities, and private marinas are available.

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Lake Almanor

Eagle Lake – The second largest natural lake in California, Eagle Lake is framed by pine and sage. Camping, fishing, swimming, picnicking, and boating are popular activities. Family and group campgrounds, naturalist activities, marina, boat launch facilities, a store, a laundry area, and showers are available. The Eagle Lake Recreation Trail, 4.7 miles long, is ideal for bicycles or just a pleasant stroll. Eagle Lake is famed for its trophy trout.

Eagle Lake

Eagle Lake

 


Lassen National Forest Camping

Hat Creek Ranger District Developed Campsites
  • Bridge: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4000’, 25 sites, no drinking water. Season: late April – October.
  • Big Pine: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4500’, 19 sites, hand pumped water. Season: May – October.
  • Cave: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4300’, 46 sites, water. Season: late April – October. 16 sites open all year.
  • Dusty: Off Highway 89. On gravel road on Lake Britton. Fee, elevation 3000’, 7 sites which consist of 2 groups sites (up to 25 people) and 5 family sites (up to 10 people), no drinking water available, vault toilets. Operated by PG&E.
  • Hat Creek (Hat): On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4300’, 75 sites, water. Season: late April – October.
  • Hat Creek Group: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4300’, 3 group sites, water, reservation required. Season: late April – October. Rocky: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4000’, 8 sites, no drinking water available. Season: late April – October.
  • Honn: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 3500’, 6 sites, no drinking water available. Season: late April – October.

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Almanor Ranger District Developed Campsites
  • Alder Creek: On Highway 32. Fee, elevation 3900’, 6 sites, stream water. Season: late April – Nov. 1, weather permitting.
  • Almanor: On Lake Almanor. Fee, elevation 4550’, 103 sites, reservations available on 19 sites, accessible restroom at Almanor North, piped water. Season: May 1 – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Almanor Group: On Highway 89. Fee, elevation 4550’, reservations required. Season: May 1 – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Almanor Legacy: On the west side of Lake Almanor. Fee, elevation 4500’, 14 sites, RVs ok, water & electric at each site, but no sewer hookups. Season: May – October, weather permitting.
  • Battle Creek: On Highway 36. Fee, elevation 4800’, 50 sites, piped water. Season: late April – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Black Rock: On Ponderosa Way. No fee, elevation 2100’, 6 sites, stream water. Season: all year, weather permitting. Road not maintained November – May.
  • Butte Meadows: Off Highway 32. Fee, elevation 4600’, 13 sites, piped water. Season: late April – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Cherry Hill: Off Highway 32. Fee, elevation 4700’, 26 sites, hand pumped water. Season: late April – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Domingo Springs: Off Highway 36. Fee, elevation 5060’, 18 sites, piped water. Season: late May – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Elam: On Highway 32. Fee, elevation 4400’, 15 sites, hand pumped water. Season: mid April – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Gurnsey: On Highway 36. Fee, elevation 4700’, 52 sites, piped water. Season: May 1 – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Gurnsey Group: On Highway 36. Fee, elevation 4700’, piped water, reservations required. Season: May 1 – November 1, weather permitting.
  • High Bridge: Off Highway 36. Fee, elevation 5200’, 12 sites, hand pumped water. Season: late May – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Hole-in-the-Ground: Off Highway 36. Fee, elevation 4300’, 13 spaces, piped water. Season: late April – November 1, weather permitting
  • Potato Patch: On Highway 32. Fee, elevation 3400’, 32 sites, piped water. Season: April – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Rocky Knoll: At Silver Lake. Fee, elevation 6000’, 18 sites, hand pumped water. Season: late May – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Silver Bowl: At Silver Lake. Fee, elevation 6000’, 18 sites, hand pumped water. Season: late May – November 1, weather permitting.
  • Soldier Meadows: Off Road 308, out of Chester. Fee, elevation 4890’, site numbers vary, stream water. Season: late May – November 1, weather permitting.

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Eagle Lake Ranger District Developed Campsites
  • Aspen Grove: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, 26 sites, tents-only campground, piped water. Season: May – September.
  • Bogard: Off Highway 44. Fee, elevation 5600’, 11 sites, hand pump water, maximum trailer length 25’. Season: May – October.
  • Butte Creek: Off Highway 44. No fee, elevation 5600’, 10 sites, unimproved campsites, no drinking water available. Season: May – October.
  • Crater Lake: Off Highway 44. Seven miles of steep, rough road to campground, motorhomes and large trailers not recommended. Fee, elevation 6800’, 17 sites, hand pump water, no gas motors on boats. Season: June – October.
  • Christie: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, 69 sites, accessible facilities, piped water, some pull through sites for large equipment (check with campground host). Season: May – September,
  • Eagle: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, 50 sites, accessible facilities, piped water. Reservations only beginning May 15. Season: May – September.
  • Goumaz: Off Highway 36 or 44. Fee, elevation 5200’, 5 sites, unimproved campsites for small equipment, drinking water available. Season: May – October.
  • Merrill: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, 173 sites with full and partial hook-ups, longer spurs, dump station. Season: May – October.
  • Roxie Peconom: Off Highway 36. No fee, elevation 4800’, 10 sites, park in lot, walk into camp sites, hand pump water. Season: May – October.
  • West Eagle Group #1: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, maximum of 100 people, parking lot available, piped water. Reservations only. Season: May – October.
  • West Eagle Group #2: At south end of Eagle Lake. Fee, elevation 5100’, maximum 75 people, parking lot available, piped water. Reservations only. Season: May – October.

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The Lassen National Forest has been an eyewitness to history. From the first Paleo-Indian hunter to follow big game through the area 12,000 years ago to the construction of a NASA-designed lookout tower in the 20th century, new people and new technology have always been a part of the forest landscape here. Native peoples have called this area home for more than ten millennia and their descendants still live, work, and carry on cultural traditions in forest communities. Euro-American explorers and emigrants came to the forest during the 1800s on foot, horseback, or driving ox carts laden with the possessions of their life’s work. They settled in this country and scratched out a living farming, ranching, and harvesting timber. President Teddy Roosevelt officially recognized the Lassen National Forest as part of a “forest reserve” system in the West in 1905. It formally became a “national forest” in 1908. People from all over the world continue to come to the forest to recreate on the ancient landscapes and in doing so, walk, hike, and bike the paths of history.

Lassen National Forest Day Hiking Areas

Day Hiking Areas

Almanor Ranger District

Eagle Lake Ranger District -The second largest natural lake in California, Eagle Lake is framed by pine and sage. Camping, fishing, swimming, picnicking, and boating are popular activities. Family and group campgrounds, naturalist activities, marina, boat launch facilities, store, laundry, and showers are available. The seven mile long South Shore Trail is ideal for bicycles or just a pleasant stroll. Eagle Lake is famed for its trophy trout.

Hat Creek Ranger District

Thousand Lakes Wilderness

Backpacking Areas

Almanor Ranger District

In a scenic mountain setting, Lake Almanor is one of the largest man-made lakes in California at 75 square miles. It offers fishing, boating, water-skiing, swimming, camping, and picnicking. The Almanor Recreation Trail winds along the west side of Almanor providing views of the lake, the mountains, wildflowers, and wildlife. Family and group campgrounds, boat launch facilities, and  private marinas are available.

Eagle Lake Ranger District

The second largest natural lake in California, Eagle Lake is framed by pine and sage. Camping, fishing, swimming, picnicking, and boating are popular activities. Family and group campgrounds, naturalist activities, marina, boat launch facilities, store, laundry, and showers are available. The seven mile long South Shore Trail is ideal for bicycles or just a pleasant stroll. Eagle Lake is famed for its trophy trout.

Hat Creek Ranger District

Hat Creek includes the Intermountain Area communities of Burney, Fall River Mills, Hat Creek and Old Station. In the shadow of Lassen Peak, seven campgrounds and four picnic areas are nestled along ten miles of Hat Creek. Opportunities for fishing, hiking, camping, picnicking, wildlife observation and natural history are many. Lava tubes, dormant and extinct volcanoes, massive lava flows and fault lines reveal a fascinating volcanic past.

Fish the world renowned stream, hike geologic wonders and experience excellent photo opportunities of Lassen Peak in the Hat Creek Area.

The following list of recreation activities are available in the Hat Creek Recreation Area. For more detailed information please stop by the Old Station Visitor Information Center at 13435 Brian’s Way Highway 44/89 in Old Station, CA. You can also call or visit our Hat Creek District Office located in Fall River Mills. Give us a call year-around Monday – Friday at (530) 336-5521. Enjoy your visit to this very interesting country.

Thousand Lakes Wilderness

Located with-in the southern portion of the Cascade Mountain Range is 16,335 acres of contrasting topography.   Thousand Lakes Wilderness is midway between the town of Burney and Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Volcanic and glacial formations, rocky ravines, mountain slopes, open meadows, and stands of lodgepole pine and red fir define the Wilderness. It is dominated by 8,677 foot Crater Peak, the highest point on the Lassen National Forest, and is a reminder of the glacial action that eroded Thousand Lakes Volcano and created the many small lakes and ponds scattered throughout. The lowest point in the Wilderness occurs at the base of the volcano at 5,546 feet.

The seven major lakes that lie within the Wilderness valley contain trout. Several species of wildlife make their home in the Wilderness. With a little luck and a good pair of binoculars you might spot some the more permanent residents; black-tailed deer, black bear, pika, pine marten, northern goshawk, spotted owl, pileated woodpecker, and Clark’s nutcracker. Even elk have been known to visit occasionally.

Another critter worth mentioning is the mosquito. At times they are thick and hungry. It would be advisable to carry insect repellent in your pack.

The summer use period is approximately June 15 to October 15, although early spring could open up the lower areas by Memorial Day. Your experience will be enhanced and impacts will less by avoiding weekends and holidays, and heavily used areas.